high school – Sahara Acaps http://sahara-acaps.org/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 20:05:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sahara-acaps.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-59-120x120.png high school – Sahara Acaps http://sahara-acaps.org/ 32 32 Bringing personal finance to the classroom for Gen Z https://sahara-acaps.org/bringing-personal-finance-to-the-classroom-for-gen-z/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 02:32:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/bringing-personal-finance-to-the-classroom-for-gen-z/ “When it’s mandatory, everyone has access,” said Rebecca Maxcy, director of the Financial Education Initiative at the University of Chicago. Update March 18, 2022, 9:32 p.m. ET While progress between the states is encouraging, there’s still more to be done, said Nan J. Morrison, president and CEO of the Council for Economic Education. Currently, only […]]]>

“When it’s mandatory, everyone has access,” said Rebecca Maxcy, director of the Financial Education Initiative at the University of Chicago.

While progress between the states is encouraging, there’s still more to be done, said Nan J. Morrison, president and CEO of the Council for Economic Education. Currently, only nine of 23 states require personal finance to be taken as a standalone course. Others allow the subject to be combined with other courses, such as math or social studies, or offer other ways for students to opt out of the course, which can dilute its impact.

Along with the new report, the council announced the creation, with Visa, of a coalition of businesses and non-profit groups, called EndEd50to help promote “guaranteed access” to personal finance courses in all states.

Here are some questions and answers about financial literacy education:

Occasionally. But the growth of state demands for teaching economics has stalled. Two years ago, 25 states required a high school economics course, and that number hasn’t budged, according to the report from the Council for Economic Education. And two states have recently considered removing requirements to study economics.

“We’re actually a bit worried about that,” Ms Morrison said.

She said the board would take a closer look at why efforts to expand economics education had stalled. Students need to understand both economics and personal finance, she said, ‘to successfully navigate their lives’ as individuals and as members of increasingly complex societies. .

There has been debate about what works, with some studies suggesting that financial education has limited effect about behavior, or that students might be better off simply learning more math. But newer research suggests that high school personal finance courses can help young people make better financial decisions.

A study published in 2020 conducted by a Montana State University researcher found that financial education requirements were linked to fewer loan defaults and higher credit scores among young adults. And one study 2019 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that money orders “significantly reduced” the likelihood of borrowing high-interest payday loans. As with any subject, Professor Lusardi said, effective teaching requires a high-quality curriculum and well-trained teachers.

]]>
Predictions 2022: Bob Fiscella, Dunwoody Homeowners Association https://sahara-acaps.org/predictions-2022-bob-fiscella-dunwoody-homeowners-association/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/predictions-2022-bob-fiscella-dunwoody-homeowners-association/ Editor’s Note: 2022 certainly promises to be another high-news year, from an ongoing fight against COVID-19 to a debate over whether Buckhead should break with Atlanta. Reporter Newspapers polled local leaders to find out what they think are the biggest issues over the next 12 months. See all the predictions here. Looking into my crystal […]]]>


Editor’s Note: 2022 certainly promises to be another high-news year, from an ongoing fight against COVID-19 to a debate over whether Buckhead should break with Atlanta. Reporter Newspapers polled local leaders to find out what they think are the biggest issues over the next 12 months. See all the predictions here.


Looking into my crystal ball, the biggest problem Dunwoody faces in 2022 will continue to be the DeKalb County School District and the way it deals with overcrowding and failing infrastructure at virtually all of its facilities inside. of city borders.

DHA along with city officials and Dunwoody stakeholders need to keep the pressure on DCSD to resolve these issues because, as we have all learned, when it comes to the school district, the squeaky wheel gets the grease. .

Dunwoody must continue to lobby for the construction of the proposed new elementary school near the intersection of Chamblee Dunwoody Rd. And Shallowford Road. Is this the perfect location for a new school? Maybe not, but it is necessary.

It is also necessary to eliminate the situation of overcrowding in high school, and unfortunately adding on the current facility is not the answer. An addition just doesn’t solve some of the major issues, including the lack of sports facilities and parking.

Traffic will only get worse in Dunwoody in 2022 as new construction, mostly on the commercial side, dumps more vehicles onto our roads with no new infrastructure in sight.

The good news for Dunwoody owners is that home prices will continue to rise. As a real estate agent, I have no doubts that stocks will stay low which will keep demand high. Of course, until you sell your house, the only thing the price increase does is increase your tax bill.








]]>
No Beach Day Copyright Lawsuit for Homeowners Association at Upscale SC Resort | Business https://sahara-acaps.org/no-beach-day-copyright-lawsuit-for-homeowners-association-at-upscale-sc-resort-business/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 18:15:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/no-beach-day-copyright-lawsuit-for-homeowners-association-at-upscale-sc-resort-business/ The top of the range Prince george the community just south of Pawleys Island offers everything a multi-million dollar oceanfront mansion buyer could want: bike paths; nature walks; tennis court; swimming pool; a clubhouse; and, of course, a private beach. But on closer inspection, this beach featured on the Prince George Homeowners Association website is […]]]>


The top of the range Prince george the community just south of Pawleys Island offers everything a multi-million dollar oceanfront mansion buyer could want: bike paths; nature walks; tennis court; swimming pool; a clubhouse; and, of course, a private beach.

But on closer inspection, this beach featured on the Prince George Homeowners Association website is not part of residential development at all. In fact, it’s not even in South Carolina.

This is a photograph of the Cape Hatteras National Park in North Carolina. And, it turns out that the photo is protected by copyright.

Panoramic Stock Images Ltd. – a Chicago-area company that provides photos, for a fee, of landscapes, city skylines, travel destinations and other subjects – pointed out ownership of its copyright in a pair of letters about a year ago at Prince George Community Association. These letters demanded compensation for the use of the image and threatened damages of up to $ 150,000 if the case went to court. As the association did not respond, Panoramic filed a complaint.

In a matter to be heard by Justice Richard Gergel in Charleston, Panoramic accuses the community nonprofit association of copyright infringement. Panoramic wants the community group to pay unspecified actual and punitive damages, and he wants the group banned from using the photo.

The community association denies any wrongdoing, stating in court documents that its use of the photo falls within the Fair use doctrine, which allows the unlicensed use of certain copyrighted material in certain circumstances. To support their position, the group says the photo in question lacks originality and commercial value – some of the factors that would make it eligible for fair use.

The community association adds that it did not know that the image was protected by copyright, that its use of the image was “innocent and unintentional” and that the group did not benefit financially from its. use. A review of the group’s website this week shows the photo has apparently been deleted.

No hearing date has been set.






David Rubenstein will discuss his book “American Experiment: Dialogues on a Dream” at the Charleston Library Society on December 14th. File/Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP


your basket is empty

You might think the man behind one of the largest private equity firms in the world – a company that has high tech companies among its investments – would be well versed in e-commerce.

Corn David Rubenstein, co-founder of The Carlyle Group and a speaker on December 14 at a Charleston Library Society event, says he never bought anything from an online retailer.

“I have never bought anything online because my technological skills are limited,” Rubenstein said. Post and courier. “Never. I wouldn’t know how to do it. I’m always afraid that someone will steal my credit card number or something.”

The 72-year-old Baltimore native said his resistance to financial transactions on the web extended to online banking. One of the richest men in the world, with a net worth of $ 4.3 billion, according to Forbes, prefers to do his banking the old-fashioned way.

“I don’t do any of that online,” he said, “But, you know, I realize I’m older and therefore I’m different.”

Rubenstein, who pledged to donate half his fortune to philanthropic causes, has found a niche in the media with a Bloomberg Television show in which he interviews prominent business leaders and as the author of best-selling books examining American history. His most recent book, “The American experience: Dialogues on a dream “, is a collection of interviews with historians, diplomats, music legends, and sports figures exploring topics such as religious freedom, the Vietnam War, civil rights, immigration, and jazz.

Rubenstein will discuss his new book at the Charleston Library Society at 6 p.m. on December 14 at 164 King Street. Tickets cost $ 30. For more information, visit the company website.






Christine Osborne and Patrick Byrant

Christine Osborne, co-founder of the Wonder Works toy store, recently received one of two “Charleston Entrepreneur of the Year Awards” from the Harbor Entrepreneur Center and its president, Patrick Bryant. Harbor Entrepreneur Center / Supplied


Golden Cigars

They started businesses and then withdrew. Now they are reaping the rewards.

Christine osborne, co-founder of the toy store Wonder works, and Jean La Cour, founder of the cybersecurity company PhishLabs, are this year’s recipients of the Charleston Entrepreneur of the Year Awards.

the Port Entrepreneurs Center bestowed the honors at its annual Founders Ball recently in Charleston.

Earlier this year, Osborne sold the toy store company she co-founded in 1990 to a longtime Charleston employee. Elizabeth “Schnookie” Darby.

Cybersecurity firm LaCour, founded in Washington, DC, in 2008, a year before moving the business to the Lowcountry, has been sold to a global software company based in Minnesota. Help systems in autumn.






Jean La Cour

Harbor Entrepreneur Center President Patrick Bryant (left) is shown with John LaCour, founder of cybersecurity firm PhishLabs, who recently received one of two “Charleston Entrepreneur of the Year Awards.” Harbor Entrepreneur Center / Supplied


Over 100 Charleston fellow entrepreneurs make nominations and then vote for the business leaders they believe have had the most successful entrepreneurial successes for the Charleston community over the past 12 months.

“I believe that entrepreneurship is the number one agent of change in the world: creating jobs, innovating in new technologies and improving the lives of all,” said Patrick bryant, president of the Harbor Entrepreneur Center. “John and Christine both embody that through the amazing companies they’ve created and launched this year.”

Traditionally, recipients are also given a 24-karat gold cigar to commemorate the occasion.

Give back

The shipping agency that owns and operates the Charleston Harbor has awarded a total of $ 205,000 in grants to 111 nonprofit and community organizations across South Carolina as part of its Community giving program.

It is part of the State Port Authoritythe decision to donate a portion of its income each year to support charities in the communities where the port operates.

The SPA “strongly believes in supporting great South Carolina organizations that work tirelessly to make a meaningful and measurable difference in people’s lives,” Jim Newsome, agency president and CEO, said in a statement. “In a time of economic hardship for many, (SPA) is proud to play a small role in supporting the important work accomplished by grant recipients.

Many of this year’s grant recipients are dedicated to improving the lives of children through mentoring, outdoor and enrichment programs, and confidence-building programs. The grants will also support literacy programs, food programs for people in need and the elderly, literacy programs and workforce development.

For a complete list of grant recipients, visit the SPA website.

Dominion scholarships

Clinton Washington III was in trouble a year ago. the Furman University The student was stressed by the spread of COVID-19, with his mother the sole breadwinner and the school’s spring semester preparing to begin.

A notification from Energy of Domination helped relieve her stress.

Washington was one of the first recipients of a scholarship awarded through the public service Education Equity Scholarship Program.

“When I received the news regarding the Dominion Energy Scholarship for Equity in Education, I was so ecstatic because I knew it would create immense relief for myself and my family to enter my last. year, ”Washington said.

Dominion is preparing to award an additional 60 scholarships to students planning to attend two- and four-year colleges in the 2022 school year.

The Virginia-based utility has $ 500,000 in scholarships to be awarded to under-represented minority students. Twenty scholarships of $ 5,000 each will go to students enrolled in two-year schools and 40 scholarships of $ 10,000 each will go to students enrolled in four-year schools.

Dominion CEO Robert M. Blue said that helping reduce the financial hurdle many underrepresented students face allows scholarship recipients to have better access to post-secondary education and additional opportunities to propel their future.

The application period for the 2022 scholarships opened on November 30 and will end on January 25. To be eligible, students must identify themselves as Black or African American; Hispanic or Latino; American Indian or native of Alaska; Asian; or native of Hawaii or other Pacific Islander with graduate fees.

Applicants must be high school or graduate students, or current undergraduate students residing in Connecticut, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Idaho , Wyoming, or Utah, with the intention of enrolling full-time at an accredited two-year or four-year college, university, or technical vocational school for the entire upcoming school year.

Dominion plans to spend a total of $ 10 million over six years to help underrepresented minority students meet their higher education expenses. For more information or to apply, visit DominionEnergy.com/EquityScholarships.

Our bi-weekly newsletter features all of the business stories that shape Charleston and South Carolina. Get ahead with us – it’s free.


]]>
School association president says minister’s letter sows confusion https://sahara-acaps.org/school-association-president-says-ministers-letter-sows-confusion/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/school-association-president-says-ministers-letter-sows-confusion/ Breadcrumb Links Saskatchewan A fracas over proof of COVID-19 vaccination at a Swift Current volleyball game in Swift Current has swelled into a province-wide hubbub. Publication date : November 18, 2021 • November 18, 2021 • 4 minute read • Join the conversation Minister Dustin Duncan said unvaccinated students should not be barred from participating […]]]>

A fracas over proof of COVID-19 vaccination at a Swift Current volleyball game in Swift Current has swelled into a province-wide hubbub.

Content of the article

A fracas over proof of COVID-19 vaccinations at a volleyball game in Swift Current became a political issue on Thursday as Saskatchewan school divisions were puzzled by an apparent change in government advice provincial on COVID-19.

Advertising

Content of the article

Education Minister Dustin Duncan wrote to school division presidents on Wednesday, warning them not to exclude unvaccinated students from after-school activities after some of his Weyburn constituents complained about a proof requirement vaccination at an upcoming provincial championship game, where a local medical officer of health implemented the measure because the host school is in an active outbreak of COVID-19.

Saskatchewan School Boards Association president Shawn Davidson said Duncan’s letter has caused confusion among the province’s 27 divisions, none of which have policies limiting what a student can do if they don’t. is not vaccinated or does not provide proof of a negative test.

“Confusion is a fair term when it comes to what she created,” Davidson said.

The confusion was also apparent in the Legislative Assembly, where NDP education critic Carla Beck accused Duncan of pandering to vaccine opponents. Duncan accused the opposition of wanting to deny unvaccinated children the chance to go to school.

At one point, NDP Leader Ryan Meili was asked and agreed to withdraw his use of the word “criminal.”

NDP Education Critic Carla Beck accused Minister Dustin Duncan of
NDP Education Critic Carla Beck accused Minister Dustin Duncan of “twisting political rhetoric.” Photo by TROY FLEECE /Regina Chief’s Post

Neither party explicitly supports the exclusion of unvaccinated children from extracurricular activities.

Duncan said he sent the letter to clarify the government’s position that extracurricular activities are as essential as classroom learning.

“We have always said that the ability to participate in school learning and school activities should not be dictated or determined by a student’s immunization status,” Duncan said.

Advertising

Content of the article

The decision to require proof of vaccination or a recent negative test at the Swift Current tournament, however, was not made by the Chinook School Division, but by the local medical officer of health, who has the authority, under public health provincial government, to introduce stricter rules where deemed necessary. . Spokesperson Joanne Booth wrote in a statement that Swift Current Comprehensive High School is in an active outbreak of COVID-19.

“The Chinook School Division currently has no general requirement for students participating in extracurricular activities to be vaccinated, other than as a result of additional measures implemented by the SHA during outbreaks, for an individual who tests positive and for close contact with a positive case,” Booth wrote.

Davidson said Duncan’s letter “diverged” from previous government messages, giving divisions some leeway to implement measures on the advice of local medical officers.

The Department of Health confirmed the local agent in Swift Current, for example, recommended that attendees present proof of vaccination or a recent negative test. The ministry said it sent a letter to divisions earlier this month stating that all school events were exempt from proof of vaccination or testing requirements.

“From the feedback I received, the divisions were working on some of these challenges at their local level, which certainly led to complications,” Davidson said.

Advertising

Content of the article

Public health orders have made explicit exceptions to self-isolation orders and other rules to help schools operate. Duncan said he felt extracurricular activities were an integral part of it and should be exempt from proof of vaccinations or test orders.

Davidson said he agreed extracurricular activities were “vitally important” to these operations, but said he did not believe they deserved the same status as classroom learning.

“It doesn’t align with our essential service, which is education,” Davidson said. “And there’s a line there that we’re having a bit of a hard time tying it all together.”

Davidson said divisions do not have the authority to set policies at institutions where many after-school programs take place. Local curling or skating rinks owned by cities or private operators, for example, may choose or be required to request proof of vaccination or a recent negative test. Traveling sports teams may have to stop at restaurants with the same requirements, Davidson noted.

“There are so many things beyond the control of school divisions.

He worries the smash has created a public perception that divisions want to bar students from events because they aren’t vaccinated — something no school division has a policy of doing, he said. he declares.

“I think we understand the intent, that there is no government intent to implement a large-scale vaccination mandate for those who wish to participate in extracurricular activities,” Davidson said.

Advertising

Content of the article

“In fact, as divisions we support that, but we have to be aware that there are all these complexities that, with our communities and within the provincial health order, we have to be able to resolve. .”

zvescera@postmedia.com
twitter.com/zakvescera

News seems to be flying towards us faster all the time. From COVID-19 updates to politics and crime and everything in between, it can be hard to keep up. With that in mind, the Saskatoon StarPhoenix has created an Afternoon Headlines newsletter that can be delivered to your inbox daily to ensure you are up to date with the day’s most vital news. Click here to subscribe.

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively yet civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to be moderated before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread you follow, or if a user follows you comments. Visit our Community Rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.

]]>
Georgia High School Association’s proposed realignment comes with good news for Gainesville https://sahara-acaps.org/georgia-high-school-associations-proposed-realignment-comes-with-good-news-for-gainesville/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/georgia-high-school-associations-proposed-realignment-comes-with-good-news-for-gainesville/ The new realignment proposals are not final until schools have the opportunity to appeal their classification. Next, regions will be sliced, primarily based on geography. New regions will be defined within the next two weeks, Lindsey said. Gainesville isn’t the only public school on the move in Hall County. However, others are moving up the […]]]>

The new realignment proposals are not final until schools have the opportunity to appeal their classification.

Next, regions will be sliced, primarily based on geography.

New regions will be defined within the next two weeks, Lindsey said.

Gainesville isn’t the only public school on the move in Hall County.

However, others are moving up the classification, with the exception of Johnson moving up to Class 4A.

According to the state’s governing body for high school sports website, the new rosters will be for a two-year cycle, beginning in the fall of 2022.

Flowery Branch should upgrade to Class 5A.

Meanwhile, West Hall, East Hall, Chestatee, Cherokee Bluff and North Hall will all be Class 4A.

Riverside Military will be downgraded to Class A, with Lakeview Academy.

The biggest change in the new alignment is an additional multiplier for private schools and out-of-district students.

Gainesville is expected to have 2,280 students, with 46 coming from outside the city limits.

According to Lindsey, the red elephants will potentially be in an area with Habersham Central, Apalachee, Lanier and Shiloh, among others.

“Most of these schools we used to play at (in the past) so everyone here feels good,” Lindsey added.

Gainesville is in the second grade of Class 7A, along with the six largest public schools in Forsyth County.

Based on realignment figures, North Forsyth will also move to Class 6A, following the recent opening of East Forsyth, which is close to the Hall County line.

]]>
National Association of Schools President visits James Clemens for innovative ideas https://sahara-acaps.org/national-association-of-schools-president-visits-james-clemens-for-innovative-ideas/ https://sahara-acaps.org/national-association-of-schools-president-visits-james-clemens-for-innovative-ideas/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/national-association-of-schools-president-visits-james-clemens-for-innovative-ideas/ A special visitor took a close look this week at the special opportunities available to high school students in Madison. James Clemens High is the only school in Alabama to receive such a visit from the president of the National Association of High School Principals. Gregg Wieczorek is on tour across the country. He goes […]]]>


A special visitor took a close look this week at the special opportunities available to high school students in Madison.

James Clemens High is the only school in Alabama to receive such a visit from the president of the National Association of High School Principals.

Gregg Wieczorek is on tour across the country. He goes to at least one school in every state looking for innovative ideas to share with principals across the country. James Clemens principal Brian Clayton said the faculty and staff at JCHS really wanted to highlight the ways they put students in the right environments for hands-on learning.

“I think it’s the best thing we are doing,” Clayton said.

The high school offers several career-focused courses to make sure students have a feel for what they want to do by the time of graduation.

“Children have the opportunity to see what careers are like in these particular fields of study,” Clayton said, “rather than wait until they are in college and spend a lot of money to see what that resembles.”

On Tuesday, the director gave Wieczorek an overview of some of these programs. The visit included an engineering class, a student-run bank, and even a health lab, where students learn how to treat patients described by other students.

The programs ultimately lead to internships in which students gain actual experience in the path of their chosen career. Clayton said that even if it doesn’t work and the student doesn’t practice this profession, the programs still benefit them in one way or another.

“It’s usually reserved for tech schools and colleges. They have this opportunity here,” Wieczorek said. “I’ve never seen anything like this in a school before.”

Wieczorek plans to take these ideas and put them in a document with other ideas from schools across the country. He said education is changing and moving from seven lessons a day to a more career-oriented system.

By sharing ideas like those of James Clemens, Wieczorek aims to show that managers don’t have to create everything themselves and instead can explore opportunities to connect and work with each other.


]]>
https://sahara-acaps.org/national-association-of-schools-president-visits-james-clemens-for-innovative-ideas/feed/ 0
FirstService Residential now manages the Morrison Ranch Estates Owners Association in Agoura Hills, CA https://sahara-acaps.org/firstservice-residential-now-manages-the-morrison-ranch-estates-owners-association-in-agoura-hills-ca/ https://sahara-acaps.org/firstservice-residential-now-manages-the-morrison-ranch-estates-owners-association-in-agoura-hills-ca/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/firstservice-residential-now-manages-the-morrison-ranch-estates-owners-association-in-agoura-hills-ca/ “We are honored and thrilled to partner with the Morrison Ranch community,” said Shauna Gatlin, Regional Director of FirstService Residential. “Through our transparent, team-based service model, we hope to make a difference in the lives of residents of Morrison Ranch on a daily basis.” AGOURA HILLS, Calif. (PRWEB) July 13, 2021 First Residential Service, the […]]]>


“We are honored and thrilled to partner with the Morrison Ranch community,” said Shauna Gatlin, Regional Director of FirstService Residential. “Through our transparent, team-based service model, we hope to make a difference in the lives of residents of Morrison Ranch on a daily basis.”

First Residential Service, the leading community management company in North America, won the management contract for the Morrison Ranch Estates Homeowners Association in Agoura Hills, California. FirstService Residential began managing the 1,226-unit single-family home community on June 1, 2021.

“We are honored and thrilled to partner with the Morrison Ranch community,” said Shauna Gatlin, Regional Director of FirstService Residential. “Through our transparent, team-based service model, we hope to make a difference in the lives of residents of Morrison Ranch on a daily basis.”

Founded in 1978, Morrison Ranch Estates is surrounded by green belts, rolling hills and mature trees. Single-family homes range from 2,400 to 4,000 square feet and feature open floor plans with three to five bedrooms and two-car garages. The community is located near the parks, restaurants and shopping centers of Westlake Village. Residents are a short drive from Malibu Beach, Santa Monica, and downtown Los Angeles. Morrison Ranch is part of the award-winning Las Virgenes School District, which includes Willow Elementary School, Lindero Canyon Middle School, and Agoura High School.

“We couldn’t be more excited to work with Morrison Ranch, with the goal of improving the value of their property and the resident experience,” said Matthew Ross, Director of Business Development at FirstService Residential. “We are convinced that this is the start of a long-term and fruitful partnership. “

About FirstService Residential

FirstService Residential is the leader in property management in North America, partnering with 8,500 communities in the United States and Canada, including low, mid and high rise condominiums and co-ops; single family communities; planned, lifestyle-oriented and active adult communities; and mixed-use and rental buildings. HOAs, community associations, condominiums and strata companies rely on their vast experience, resources and local expertise to maximize property value and improve the lifestyle of their residents. Dedicated to making a difference, every day, FirstService Residential goes above and beyond to provide exceptional service. FirstService Residential is a subsidiary of FirstService Corporation (FSV), a North American leader in the real estate services industry.

For more information visit http://www.fsresidential.com/california.

Share the article on social media or by email:


]]>
https://sahara-acaps.org/firstservice-residential-now-manages-the-morrison-ranch-estates-owners-association-in-agoura-hills-ca/feed/ 0
After the Illinois High School Association board of directors extended Carlyle’s contract to host the state bass fishing finals for another three years, changes seem inevitable with bass fishing in Illinois high schools. https://sahara-acaps.org/after-the-illinois-high-school-association-board-of-directors-extended-carlyles-contract-to-host-the-state-bass-fishing-finals-for-another-three-years-changes-seem-inevitable-with-bass-fishing-in-il/ https://sahara-acaps.org/after-the-illinois-high-school-association-board-of-directors-extended-carlyles-contract-to-host-the-state-bass-fishing-finals-for-another-three-years-changes-seem-inevitable-with-bass-fishing-in-il/#respond Fri, 25 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/after-the-illinois-high-school-association-board-of-directors-extended-carlyles-contract-to-host-the-state-bass-fishing-finals-for-another-three-years-changes-seem-inevitable-with-bass-fishi A decade-long storm building came to a head on June 14 when the Illinois High School Association board of trustees approved the three-year extension of Carlyle’s hosting of the state finals for fishing at bass. The first 12 finals took place on Lake Carlyle. “I guarantee that many schools will retire from IHSA bass fishing,” […]]]>


A decade-long storm building came to a head on June 14 when the Illinois High School Association board of trustees approved the three-year extension of Carlyle’s hosting of the state finals for fishing at bass. The first 12 finals took place on Lake Carlyle.

“I guarantee that many schools will retire from IHSA bass fishing,” said Batavia coach Brian Drendel said.

IHSA should listen to him. He was part of the original advisory committee. He helped organize a section each year. He became president of the Illinois Bass Fishing Coaches Association, whose first board meeting was held in January 2020.

“Kids deserve better lake fishing and coaches deserve a more central lake so they don’t have to drive [up to five-hours-plus]”said Drendel.

Carlyle is excellent at crappie fishing and produced the previous Illinois record for flathead catfish. As far as tournament bass fishing goes, this is the least sought after of Illinois’ great waters.

According to ifishillinois.org, Carlyle hosted just 11 tournaments in 2020 with the largest total bag of five fish at 75.94 pounds. It’s overshadowed by Lake Shelbyville (69, 842.5), Lake Rend (59, 842.5), Lake Springfield (49, 473.19), Lake Clinton (50, 414) and Chain O ‘ Lakes (40, 287.25).

Carlyle is long and sensitive to storms, winds and waves in May. Only twice have the finals gone as planned. The other 10 were postponed, delayed or cut short.

Shelbyville or Clinton would be the most central, but neither has enough infrastructure nearby. No longer does. The chain is uncertain about neighboring dwellings and it is not central.

Organizing a state final is much more than fishing. With a field of 70 boats and support for a two-day event, hundreds of restaurants and accommodation nearby are needed.

That leaves Carlyle and Springfield. Both have submitted offers this year. Springfield is superior for restaurants and hotels, as well as better bass fishing.

Still, the IHSA Board of Directors chose Carlyle, as IHSA Executive Director Craig Anderson explained: a. They helped us make the dream of a state bass fishing championship come true and embraced the event as a community in every way they could. We are proud to be returning to lead the event for three years.

The first two sentences are true. The conclusion shouldn’t be.

“I find it hard to believe the offers were equal, Carlyle is not geographically central,” Drendel said. “Call it complicity or laziness, they just wanted to stick with what they knew or something fishy was going on under the table.”

After the board meeting, he responded to calls and messages from across the state expressing his displeasure.

Drendel noted one of the ideas suggested by the original advisory committee to move the finals each year. Retired IHSA administrator Dave Gannaway, the mastermind behind IHSA bass fishing, advised holding the first few years on the same lake to keep it going.

Several coaches on the advisory committee had the impression that the finals would turn in a few years. Instead, the top 15 will be on Carlyle.

The IBFCA wasn’t just about moving Carlyle’s finals. They set up the Illinois State Coach and Student Tournament Trail. Even in the midst of a pandemic, it took off. Events took place across the state and drew fields as large as 60 boats.

At the ICASTT final on June 13, $ 14,000 in scholarships was awarded to the 57-boat course on Clinton, won by Galatia.

Several coaches have called it the Real State Championship.

“The coaches contacted the IHSA to change the lake,” Drendel said. “It all fell on deaf ears.”

So the change is blowing.

Despite all the issues with Carlyle Lake, this has been part of the growth of high school bass fishing in Illinois, pictured by Jim O’Neil, here in a 2011 file photo with one of larger bass caught, who would go on to become a boatmaster and trainer.
Dale bowman


]]>
https://sahara-acaps.org/after-the-illinois-high-school-association-board-of-directors-extended-carlyles-contract-to-host-the-state-bass-fishing-finals-for-another-three-years-changes-seem-inevitable-with-bass-fishing-in-il/feed/ 0
The Illinois High School Association board of directors announced Monday that the state finals for bass fishing will remain in Carlyle for the next three years; Carlyle also hosted the top 12. https://sahara-acaps.org/the-illinois-high-school-association-board-of-directors-announced-monday-that-the-state-finals-for-bass-fishing-will-remain-in-carlyle-for-the-next-three-years-carlyle-also-hosted-the-top-12/ https://sahara-acaps.org/the-illinois-high-school-association-board-of-directors-announced-monday-that-the-state-finals-for-bass-fishing-will-remain-in-carlyle-for-the-next-three-years-carlyle-also-hosted-the-top-12/#respond Mon, 14 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/the-illinois-high-school-association-board-of-directors-announced-monday-that-the-state-finals-for-bass-fishing-will-remain-in-carlyle-for-the-next-three-years-carlyle-also-hosted-the-top-12 Despite complaints that Carlyle is the sole host for the first 12 years of the Illinois High School Association State Finals for Bass Fishing, the finals will remain on Carlyle Lake for the next three years. Hopes of moving the finals to Springfield Lake were dashed Monday with the announcement from the IHSA board of […]]]>


Despite complaints that Carlyle is the sole host for the first 12 years of the Illinois High School Association State Finals for Bass Fishing, the finals will remain on Carlyle Lake for the next three years.

Hopes of moving the finals to Springfield Lake were dashed Monday with the announcement from the IHSA board of directors.

“The Town of Carlyle, Carlyle High School, the Army Corp. of Engineers who oversee Carlyle Lake and a host of area volunteers have been with us from day one,” said the IHSA Executive Director, Craig Anderson, in a statement. “They helped us realize the dream of a state bass fishing championship and embraced the event as a community in every way they could. We are proud to return to lead the event for three years.

Only twice in those 12 years at Carlyle have the State Finals gone as planned. The other 10 were postponed, delayed or cut short.

Carlyle was looked down upon by fishermen and coaches. The Illinois Bass Fishing Coaches Association was formed in 2020 “to help change the location of the IHSA State Finals to Carlyle Lake” and the IBFCA helped Springfield make an offer to host the final, according to Batavia coach and IBFCA president Brian Drendel.

Humberto Gonzalez, former Naperville North coach, wrote two years ago: “Carlyle Lake is a death trap waiting to happen.


]]>
https://sahara-acaps.org/the-illinois-high-school-association-board-of-directors-announced-monday-that-the-state-finals-for-bass-fishing-will-remain-in-carlyle-for-the-next-three-years-carlyle-also-hosted-the-top-12/feed/ 0
Around Town: New Homeowners Association President Asks, What Is Dunwoody? https://sahara-acaps.org/around-town-new-homeowners-association-president-asks-what-is-dunwoody/ https://sahara-acaps.org/around-town-new-homeowners-association-president-asks-what-is-dunwoody/#respond Thu, 06 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/around-town-new-homeowners-association-president-asks-what-is-dunwoody/ What is Dunwoody? It turns out that this is a trickier question than you might think. “What is that now? ”Bob Fiscella reflected on a sunny morning recently as we were chatting at a table outside a cafe in Dunwoody village.“ When we became a town, a lot of people thought we were a true […]]]>


What is Dunwoody? It turns out that this is a trickier question than you might think.

“What is that now? ”Bob Fiscella reflected on a sunny morning recently as we were chatting at a table outside a cafe in Dunwoody village.“ When we became a town, a lot of people thought we were a true Mayberry. A lot of people still believe in it. . But as we change demographically, I think people want it to be a lot more dynamic. Especially young people. “

Bob Fiscella, the new president of the Dunwoody Homeowners Association. (Joe Earle)

Fiscella’s new work forces her to consider how these different points of view fit together, if they do. He is the new president of the Dunwoody Owners Association, the 51-year-old, 881-member group that advocates for the city’s landlords and claims to be “one of the most powerful associations of its kind in the United States.”

DHA’s board of directors takes a stand on zoning and development issues, and the organization sponsors special family-centric events such as the Dunwoody 4th of July Parade, which it claims to be the largest in Georgia.

When considering the current role of DHA, there is a lot of history to consider. Before Dunwoody became a city, DHA operated almost like an unofficial branch of government. Developers who wanted approval to build in Dunwoody or the surrounding area must have won favor with the group. DHA had weight because of the votes it could get.

And the owner group has a lot to do with the creation of the Town of Dunwoody itself, in part as a strategy to thwart the development of apartment complexes in the area. The city and the association were so closely linked from the start that the head of DHA was elected the city’s first mayor.

Now that the city has been around for a dozen years, things have of course changed. Explaining the current role of DHA, Fiscella simply said, “In a nutshell, our role is to improve the quality of life in Dunwoody and to keep real estate values ​​high. “

Fiscella, who is 61, arrived at her new post by a detour. He’s a great guy selling real estate in and around Dunwoody these days, but his background is in televised sports.

He grew up in Texas, studied broadcasting at the University of Texas, and spent approximately 17 years covering sports for CNN. After that he worked for another five years for Fox Sports. Along the way, he says in his online biography, he interviewed sports figures such as Tiger Woods, Peyton Manning and Arnold Palmer. “Broadcasting has always been my thing,” he said.

He ended up in Dunwoody after his marriage. At the time, he lived in Midtown and his wife lived in Roswell. “Dunwoody was the compromise,” he said.

Once he started a family, the irregular work hours required of a working sports reporter took their toll and he went out. He started selling real estate, he said. “Why I chose real estate, I don’t know,” he said. “I was like, ‘OK, there are a lot of nice houses in Dunwoody. It sounds easy. But it’s a lot harder than it looks.

After the city was established in 2008, Fiscella wanted to get more involved in her community. He therefore ran for municipal council several times, but never won a seat. He now says he’s just as happy as he didn’t. “Losing this race was a blessing in disguise because those early board members had to spend a lot of time doing it,” he said.

Going forward, Fiscella says he doesn’t foresee any major changes, although he would like to raise the profile of the group. He sees DHA’s job as continuing to monitor zoning and land use planning in the region. Sitting at the Dunwoody Village cafe, he pointed out that the way the shopping center that surrounded it had been developed was one of DHA’s major past victories, and that some proposals on how to revitalize the neighborhood might pit homeowners against the city ​​in the future.

But he also said the association must also monitor schools in the city. Dunwoody needs another high school, he said, because Dunwoody High “used to be a neighborhood school and now it’s a mega-school.”

“We need to become a little more open about DeKalb County schools. I think they are the biggest threat to maintaining the value of our properties in Dunwoody, ”he said. “How do we make our voice heard now with the schools in DeKalb County?” … I think we should. “

If Dunwoody had its own school system, as some community leaders have unsuccessfully proposed in the recent past, “the value of our properties would skyrocket because it would be the best school district in the state,” Fiscella said.

“I think it’s still a pie-shaped dream in the sky,” he said, “but we need to push DeKalb County schools where possible. I think we just need to do it. hear our voices Can we demand a change I don’t know But we have to at least try.




]]>
https://sahara-acaps.org/around-town-new-homeowners-association-president-asks-what-is-dunwoody/feed/ 0