board members – Sahara Acaps http://sahara-acaps.org/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 20:05:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sahara-acaps.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-59-120x120.png board members – Sahara Acaps http://sahara-acaps.org/ 32 32 Philadelphia City Council Moves Towards Nation’s First City Bank https://sahara-acaps.org/philadelphia-city-council-moves-towards-nations-first-city-bank/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 23:34:30 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/philadelphia-city-council-moves-towards-nations-first-city-bank/ The city council voted 15-1 to pass legislation that will launch the creation of the Philadelphia Public Financial Authority on Thursday. The entity is supposed to provide loans and improve access to credit and other financial services to disadvantaged communities. It is also seen as a first step towards the city creating its own municipal […]]]>

The city council voted 15-1 to pass legislation that will launch the creation of the Philadelphia Public Financial Authority on Thursday.

The entity is supposed to provide loans and improve access to credit and other financial services to disadvantaged communities. It is also seen as a first step towards the city creating its own municipal bankwho would be the first in the country.

Although the PPFA does not initially provide checking or savings accounts, it could potentially do so in the future, which some supporters of the bill hope.

The authority “will have the ability to provide letters of credit as well as guarantees to businesses, especially black and brown businesses…that have not traditionally had this type of financial product,” council member Derek Green said. , who introduced the bill.

these financial tools are essentially a promise from the authority to traditional lenders that it will repay whatever an entrepreneur borrows.

Green, who was himself a banker, said he started working on the bill when he took office six years ago. He knows many residents who could have benefited from the program, including a friend who has a small tech business.

The business owner entered into a contract with the city in October 2021 and provided the agreed services, but was not paid due to issues on the city side. The owner then needed to borrow money to pay the payroll.

“They went to their traditional lender, who they had a 17-year relationship with, and that lender wouldn’t increase their line of credit that they needed for their cash flow,” Green said. “They were actually thinking of going to an alternative lender and paying a much higher interest rate just to generate cash flow for their employees.”

The authority’s focus on entrepreneurs of color stems from the country’s long history of redlining and loan discrimination. Green says these factors have left African Americans and Latinos own only 10% of businesses have employees in Philadelphia, even though they represent 44% and 15% of the city’s population, respectively.

Green said the PPFA was formed under the aegis of Pennsylvania Economic Development Financing Actwhich allows municipalities to form an agency that can borrow money to provide residents with loans and letters of credit.

Municipalities in Pennsylvania are prohibited from creating their own municipal banks, so this is a way around this rule, Green Recount Billy Penn.

But some of the bill’s supporters would like to see Philly enter the realm of personal banking, given that 10% of households in the city do not have a checking or savings account and 22% are underbanked. This leaves them with limited access to credit and financial services such as payday loans or check cashing services not offered by the banks where they have accounts.

The PPFA will be led by a nine-person board of directors appointed by the mayor, the Philadelphia Business Journal reports. Whenever a position becomes available, the city council will have the opportunity to recommend candidates. These trustees will appoint a nine-person policy council that will guide the day-to-day operations of the authority.

At least five board members would need five years of experience working on issues such as neighborhood small business development, public transportation, and environmental and racial justice.

Additionally, a board member must be an officer of the Pennsylvania Community Development Financial Institutions Network – a coalition financial institutions focused on community development. Another must be a member of the board of directors of a minority-owned bank and another must have worked for two years to defend the economic interests of consumers and the community.

But not everyone thinks creating a public bank is a good idea. The city government is far from free from its own financial problems.

“Do you really trust that a city that hasn’t reconciled its bank statements for seven years can reliably take taxpayers’ money and play banker with it?” Larry Platt, co-founder of the Philadelphia Citizen, wrote in a editorial on the site last month.

In the article, he points out that the city would need large public subsidies to launch the project and notes that a study of starting a public bank in San Francisco found that it would take 56 years for the project reaches the break-even point.

Platt also points out that there are other ways to increase access to credit in underserved communities of color, some of which are already being implemented in Philadelphia.

Several organizations focused on improving the flow of capital in communities like the ones Green focuses on have been created in recent years.

This includes the Philadelphia Growth, Resiliency, Independence, Tenacity Fund – a $100 million fund collaboration between 30 financial institutions to provide credit to black and brown communities through CDFI of Pennsylvania.

Platt added that there is currently a movement create more black-owned banks in the country. Currently, only 21 of the country’s more than 4,000 banks are owned by African Americans, but many believe they would do a better job providing credit to communities of color.

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Law firm Miller recoups $2.25 million for Hayes Valley Homeowners Association in just 10 months https://sahara-acaps.org/law-firm-miller-recoups-2-25-million-for-hayes-valley-homeowners-association-in-just-10-months/ Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/law-firm-miller-recoups-2-25-million-for-hayes-valley-homeowners-association-in-just-10-months/ SAN FRANCISCO, July 29, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Miller Law Firm Has Recovered $2.25 million for a Hayes Valley boutique condominium association for damages related to construction defects in just 10 months after serving the builder with notice of construction defects and violations of building standards. The 35-unit HOA board located near the Market Street corridor […]]]>

SAN FRANCISCO, July 29, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Miller Law Firm Has Recovered $2.25 million for a Hayes Valley boutique condominium association for damages related to construction defects in just 10 months after serving the builder with notice of construction defects and violations of building standards.

The 35-unit HOA board located near the Market Street corridor in Hayes Valley has retained The Miller Law Firm just days away from its 4-year anniversary. Faced with serious plumbing and sewage system defects, the board hired The Miller Law Firm, a defects attorney.

According to Senior Partner Rachel M. Miller, “Although the statute of limitations or time limits in California for HOA condos to pursue a builder claim is 10 years from the date of completion, often boards need to take legal action sooner to preserve shorter timelines. For example, there is also a plumbing deadline of 4 years. In this case, the building was only 11 days away from the 4-year deadline and faced major plumbing and sewer repair needs. By acting diligently, the Régie stopped the clock and was able to recover the sufficient funds needed to repair the building. »

The HOA sent a defect notice for plumbing and other building defects, including but not limited to warped and loose exterior panels, efflorescence and stains, stucco cracks, severe deterioration HVAC insulation on the roof and a compromised building maintenance system. The claim was settled in mediation efforts facilitated by Gerald A Kurland Esq., of JAMS, in just 10 months without filing a formal complaint in Superior Court.

“Builders’ insurance policies are often ‘burning limit’ policies, and insurance funds can erode or run out during these claims, as this insurance pays for the time of the attorney and the builder expert. As a result, we often have to work on an expedited schedule. If those funds are burned through lengthy claims processes, those are funds that are taken out of the HOA,” says Founding Partner and CEO, Thomas E. Miller. “This 10-month settlement speaks to the importance of having the right team in place to aggressively investigate common-space shortcomings and arbitrate claims outside of the often-backed court or arbitration system. Given that the Council acted within the time frame allotted executives, they were able to recover the builders insurance repair funds without the policies eroding and avoid special appraisals or the use of reserve funds for these costly repairs . »

Celebrating 40 years of practice, the law firm of Miller (www.constructiondefects.com) continues to be California authority on construction defects and primary resource for San Francisco owners, boards of directors and community management. The new 3rd The Home and Condo Defects: A Consumer Guide to Faulty Construction (2021) edition was written to aid and assist homeowners, board members, and association management companies in pursuing legitimate claims against builders and their insurance companies. Contact the Communications Director Sara Brown for more information on how to receive a copy. ([email protected])

Miller’s legal treatise, Handling Construction Defects, now in its fourth edition, remains the definitive practice guide for attorneys, mediators, arbitrators and judges.

Media Contact: Rachel Miller
(415) 437-1800
[email protected]

SOURCE The Miller Law Firm

Related links

http://www.constructiondefects.com

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Hippo enters the commercial insurance market with the product of the owners association https://sahara-acaps.org/hippo-enters-the-commercial-insurance-market-with-the-product-of-the-owners-association/ https://sahara-acaps.org/hippo-enters-the-commercial-insurance-market-with-the-product-of-the-owners-association/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/hippo-enters-the-commercial-insurance-market-with-the-product-of-the-owners-association/ Home insurtech Hippo is entering the commercial insurance market. The California-based general management agency startup said its expansion would focus on “targeted commercial insurance” customers. Its first product in the space is a bespoke homeowners association (HOA) product. This product includes data-driven subscription, satellite and aerial imagery, and consideration for the specific HOA and board […]]]>


Home insurtech Hippo is entering the commercial insurance market.

The California-based general management agency startup said its expansion would focus on “targeted commercial insurance” customers. Its first product in the space is a bespoke homeowners association (HOA) product. This product includes data-driven subscription, satellite and aerial imagery, and consideration for the specific HOA and board members.

Rick McCathron, president of Hippo, said the company’s HOA product is designed to address what Hippo sees as a lack of consistent coverage options in the industry and “to modernize the insurance experience. business while preserving the unique coverage and risk needs of each community. “

Hippo’s expansion into commercial insurance comes after the company disclosed its plans earlier this year to hit the public markets by merging with an ad hoc acquisition company. The startup will be acquired by Reinvent Technology Partners Z in an agreement that values ​​the company at $ 5 billion. Initial plans were to close the deal in mid-2021.

Initially, the HOA product is available in Arizona, but will expand to Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Colorado, Michigan, Illinois and Tennessee later this year.

The MGA plans to launch additional commercial programs in the coming months targeting condominium associations and single-family rentals.

Hippo added that it is also working on developing additional offerings that will include community services and smart devices to help strengthen protection for business customers.

According to Hippo, its HOA coverage will offer higher limits for items not included in traditional personal or business line coverage, such as swimming pools, landscaping, private roads, retaining walls and elevator collisions. . Package options also include loyalty, indoor navigation, data breaches, general liability, combined directors and officers liability and employment practices, hired and non-owned automobile liability with physical damage coverage and excess liability available covering the underlying hedging parts.

Source: Hippopotamus

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Homeowners association orders couple to remove pride flag from their front yard https://sahara-acaps.org/homeowners-association-orders-couple-to-remove-pride-flag-from-their-front-yard/ https://sahara-acaps.org/homeowners-association-orders-couple-to-remove-pride-flag-from-their-front-yard/#respond Sat, 19 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/homeowners-association-orders-couple-to-remove-pride-flag-from-their-front-yard/ A Florida homeowners association has ordered a gay couple to remove a small rainbow flag from their front yard, but the couple have no plans to remove it. Bob Plominski and Mike Ferrari of Oakland Park, Fla. Received a citation on June 5 telling them to remove the flag by June 15 or pay a […]]]>


A Florida homeowners association has ordered a gay couple to remove a small rainbow flag from their front yard, but the couple have no plans to remove it.

Bob Plominski and Mike Ferrari of Oakland Park, Fla. Received a citation on June 5 telling them to remove the flag by June 15 or pay a daily fine of $ 50. The couple put it in place to celebrate Pride Month.

Plominski and Ferrari told NBC Miami they were baffled by the notice because they have already hoisted the pride flag and posted political signs in the neighborhood without any problem.

“I got pissed off,” Plominski said. “We’ve done it before and it’s just a show of our pride in the community and it’s been in place for 30 days. We were in shock that they were going to do this.

Bob Brusseau, president of the Eastland Cove Homeowners Association, said the five-person board of directors sent the couple a notice of violation after one of the association members complained based on a rule that restricts residents from displaying only US or military flags in the neighborhood.

“It’s in the document, and you can be sued,” he told NBC News.

The fines will in fact only be enforced about 30 to 40 days from the date the citation is issued, according to Brusseau.

“Personally, I will vote against any fine,” he said, adding that two board members did not even want to pursue the case, but the other three did.

Plominski and Ferrari have the right to appeal the association’s decision to a grievance committee.

“I really think the quote is because it’s a gay pride flag and someone in the neighborhood is offended, it’s that simple,” Ferrari told NBC Miami.

The couple said they will continue to fly their pride flag until the end of the month.

“This will last until June 30,” Plominski told NBC Miami. “As a community, we’ve worked really hard to win and get to where we are today. We’re not going to back down on this one.


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Read Your Documents and Get Involved: Tips for Your First Homeowners Association – Post Bulletin https://sahara-acaps.org/read-your-documents-and-get-involved-tips-for-your-first-homeowners-association-post-bulletin/ Wed, 02 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/read-your-documents-and-get-involved-tips-for-your-first-homeowners-association-post-bulletin/ With condominiums and gated neighborhoods on the rise, more Rochester residents will eventually end up in a property with a homeowners association. The principle is simple: landlords agree to pay fees and abide by the rules in order to maintain a cohesive atmosphere in the neighborhood. Many HOAs use membership fees to perform lawn maintenance […]]]>

With condominiums and gated neighborhoods on the rise, more Rochester residents will eventually end up in a property with a homeowners association.

The principle is simple: landlords agree to pay fees and abide by the rules in order to maintain a cohesive atmosphere in the neighborhood. Many HOAs use membership fees to perform lawn maintenance and outdoor chores for the entire community. Some of the costs also go into a reserve fund, which can be used for larger repairs, such as roofs and siding. A council of members is elected from among the residents to make decisions about maintenance, finances, and adjudicate when other members want to make visible changes to their homes.

Newcomers to HOAs can find the legalese intimidating — so we spoke to people who start HOAs in Rochester for guidance.

Read the documents. Tom Hill of Matik Management said buyers have 10 days at a sale to review their HOA’s decision documents (statement, articles of association, and rules and regulations). These documents will let homeowners know how much their monthly fees will cost (usually hundreds of dollars), how council is elected, and how restrictive the rules are regarding their future homes (uniformity in design, color, and material).

Tom Hill, Matik Management

HOA documents aren’t fun to read, but it’s important to review them and seek clarification if needed before closing the sale. Many buyers look at a property and plan to make external changes, then skip reading their HOA documents during the sale, Hill said, which causes problems down the line.

“They say, ‘I want to do this, I want to do that,’ and then they look at the HOA and realize that there are stages to go through and they may not be able to complete this change,” said he declared.

The documents will also help level expectations between owners, board members and the HOA as a whole — a crucial step, said Jo Ellen Heers-Risen, secretary/treasurer of Willow Point Townhome Association.

Expect big changes. Mike Paradise, President of Bigelow Homes, has spearheaded several new properties through the creation of an HOA.

“Living in an HOA is a different way of life,” he said.

While some homeowners might seek such a community so they can travel without worrying about snow removal and winter maintenance, many young people have also looked to planned developments to avoid chores such as lawn mowing during buying their first property, he said. .

Mike Paradise Mug

Mike Paradise

Related: Builder: Housing Needs Community Support

That said, keep expectations reasonable. Those who enter an HOA because of the built-in outdoor care sometimes complain when their lawn isn’t mowed immediately or the snow “hasn’t cleared 10 minutes after the snow stops,” Paradise said. “Be patient. … Many of these companies that deal with snow and turf for associations have multiple clients. It may take them a while to get around.

Do not plan changes without approval. Each community’s rules and regulations are HOA-specific and property-specific, so buyers can’t assume a planned development’s guidelines will apply to every home they’re considering, Hill added. However, the “standard language” tends to be that “any change outside of a unit, or any change that would affect your neighbor, must be approved”.

That doesn’t just include painting or landscaping, Hill said. A resident who wishes to obtain cable television may need approval for a satellite dish. A fireplace would require a visible chimney.

Most HOAs have a board of directors or architectural control committee (ACC) made up of residents, who approve any requests for changes. These residents will check the change form against the rules and regulations of the community and come back with a confirmation or denial.

Maintain your home. Your average gated community has rows and rows of manicured landscapes and perfectly painted doors – but part of that responsibility lies with the residents.

“A common misconception is, ‘I buy property in an HOA, I’ll pay my dues, so it’s all taken care of,'” Hill said. “This is not entirely true.”

Communities have a built-in way of dealing with “bad neighbours” and those who don’t maintain their properties.

“If someone isn’t tracking a property … the HOA can actually have repairs done and then assess the costs to that property owner,” Hill said.

To be involved. One of the big benefits of living in an HOA is the “returning to that sense of community,” Hill said. “I’m 41, I remember growing up in the 80s and playing in my neighborhood, and we all knew each other. You don’t always find that now.

Hill, who manages more than a thousand units, generally sees a reluctance to participate in HOA leadership or attend board meetings. The board of directors and all the committees give directives to the management companies, and not the other way around. However, it certainly takes time and effort to become a leader.

Paradise said that while some residents fear “neighborhood politics,” the lack of volunteers is creating problems at HOAs. Hill recommends newcomers to HOAs start small.

“Get to know your board, get to know your neighbors,” he said. “Try to volunteer in some aspects. It’s important to know what’s going on.”

And finally – “Always remember that you are part of a community, so be part of the solution, not the problem,” Heers-Risen said.

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Around Town: New Homeowners Association President Asks, What Is Dunwoody? https://sahara-acaps.org/around-town-new-homeowners-association-president-asks-what-is-dunwoody/ https://sahara-acaps.org/around-town-new-homeowners-association-president-asks-what-is-dunwoody/#respond Thu, 06 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/around-town-new-homeowners-association-president-asks-what-is-dunwoody/ What is Dunwoody? It turns out that this is a trickier question than you might think. “What is that now? ”Bob Fiscella reflected on a sunny morning recently as we were chatting at a table outside a cafe in Dunwoody village.“ When we became a town, a lot of people thought we were a true […]]]>


What is Dunwoody? It turns out that this is a trickier question than you might think.

“What is that now? ”Bob Fiscella reflected on a sunny morning recently as we were chatting at a table outside a cafe in Dunwoody village.“ When we became a town, a lot of people thought we were a true Mayberry. A lot of people still believe in it. . But as we change demographically, I think people want it to be a lot more dynamic. Especially young people. “

Bob Fiscella, the new president of the Dunwoody Homeowners Association. (Joe Earle)

Fiscella’s new work forces her to consider how these different points of view fit together, if they do. He is the new president of the Dunwoody Owners Association, the 51-year-old, 881-member group that advocates for the city’s landlords and claims to be “one of the most powerful associations of its kind in the United States.”

DHA’s board of directors takes a stand on zoning and development issues, and the organization sponsors special family-centric events such as the Dunwoody 4th of July Parade, which it claims to be the largest in Georgia.

When considering the current role of DHA, there is a lot of history to consider. Before Dunwoody became a city, DHA operated almost like an unofficial branch of government. Developers who wanted approval to build in Dunwoody or the surrounding area must have won favor with the group. DHA had weight because of the votes it could get.

And the owner group has a lot to do with the creation of the Town of Dunwoody itself, in part as a strategy to thwart the development of apartment complexes in the area. The city and the association were so closely linked from the start that the head of DHA was elected the city’s first mayor.

Now that the city has been around for a dozen years, things have of course changed. Explaining the current role of DHA, Fiscella simply said, “In a nutshell, our role is to improve the quality of life in Dunwoody and to keep real estate values ​​high. “

Fiscella, who is 61, arrived at her new post by a detour. He’s a great guy selling real estate in and around Dunwoody these days, but his background is in televised sports.

He grew up in Texas, studied broadcasting at the University of Texas, and spent approximately 17 years covering sports for CNN. After that he worked for another five years for Fox Sports. Along the way, he says in his online biography, he interviewed sports figures such as Tiger Woods, Peyton Manning and Arnold Palmer. “Broadcasting has always been my thing,” he said.

He ended up in Dunwoody after his marriage. At the time, he lived in Midtown and his wife lived in Roswell. “Dunwoody was the compromise,” he said.

Once he started a family, the irregular work hours required of a working sports reporter took their toll and he went out. He started selling real estate, he said. “Why I chose real estate, I don’t know,” he said. “I was like, ‘OK, there are a lot of nice houses in Dunwoody. It sounds easy. But it’s a lot harder than it looks.

After the city was established in 2008, Fiscella wanted to get more involved in her community. He therefore ran for municipal council several times, but never won a seat. He now says he’s just as happy as he didn’t. “Losing this race was a blessing in disguise because those early board members had to spend a lot of time doing it,” he said.

Going forward, Fiscella says he doesn’t foresee any major changes, although he would like to raise the profile of the group. He sees DHA’s job as continuing to monitor zoning and land use planning in the region. Sitting at the Dunwoody Village cafe, he pointed out that the way the shopping center that surrounded it had been developed was one of DHA’s major past victories, and that some proposals on how to revitalize the neighborhood might pit homeowners against the city ​​in the future.

But he also said the association must also monitor schools in the city. Dunwoody needs another high school, he said, because Dunwoody High “used to be a neighborhood school and now it’s a mega-school.”

“We need to become a little more open about DeKalb County schools. I think they are the biggest threat to maintaining the value of our properties in Dunwoody, ”he said. “How do we make our voice heard now with the schools in DeKalb County?” … I think we should. “

If Dunwoody had its own school system, as some community leaders have unsuccessfully proposed in the recent past, “the value of our properties would skyrocket because it would be the best school district in the state,” Fiscella said.

“I think it’s still a pie-shaped dream in the sky,” he said, “but we need to push DeKalb County schools where possible. I think we just need to do it. hear our voices Can we demand a change I don’t know But we have to at least try.




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“Repaint that $ 23,000 garage door!” “ https://sahara-acaps.org/repaint-that-23000-garage-door/ https://sahara-acaps.org/repaint-that-23000-garage-door/#respond Sun, 28 Feb 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/repaint-that-23000-garage-door/ The fate of garage doors – all garage doors – isn’t exactly high on the list of global problems. But for Julie Good, her new garage doors are a triumph, a piece of resistance, a tour de force. Less hyperbolic, they improve the attractiveness of your home. “I am very sad that I have to […]]]>


The fate of garage doors – all garage doors – isn’t exactly high on the list of global problems.

But for Julie Good, her new garage doors are a triumph, a piece of resistance, a tour de force. Less hyperbolic, they improve the attractiveness of your home.

“I am very sad that I have to take them out,” said Good, 62.

When she bought the North Tustin home ten years ago, it featured a long garage with three narrow exits. Good kept banging his car in and out.

“I lost two mirrors and scratched a side panel,” Good said. Last year, after one too many repair bills, she decided a garage remodel was overdue.

Completed in mid-January, the facelift merged two of the garage doors into a larger entrance for easier maneuvering.

Pragmatics aside, Good is delighted with the aesthetic – southwest-style metal doors sporting a weathered and weathered look. “They are even more magnificent than I imagined.”

But this feeling is not universal. Shortly after the big unveiling, Good learned that his homeowners association was not that impressed. Retroactively, the board denied approval.

“Needless to say, I was shocked,” Good recalls. “It’s mind-boggling.”

A bank executive, also with a master’s degree in architecture, Good has a flair for business and a sense of beauty. She couldn’t imagine replacing the old generic doors with new generic ones. After all, the garage consumes almost the entire front of his duplex, most of which is stacked behind on the hillside.

For advice, Good turned to Ray hare – a leading photorealistic artist who consults her on interior design.

“These doors are all you see from the street,” said Hare, who lives in Anaheim. “There are a lot of things to do on them. “

Hare told Good about the striking metal doors he spotted in Palm Desert. Internet research led her to Dave Koch, an Arizona craftsman specializing in weathered metal doors.

Good flew to Tucson to meet Koch and visit homes displaying his designs. In love with the natural “tarnished” look, she hired him for the job.

Next, Good received a confusing notice from the Charter Point Community Association. The HOA oversees 54 homes in Cowan Heights – a wealthy corner of Santa Ana that borders Tustin.

“This work must be approved by the architecture committee,” read the unsigned email.

Good submitted the requested forms promptly, albeit after the fact. In response, the HOA asked him to “remove / replace / repaint or modify garage doors…. to conform to the design of the neighborhood.

“A solid color would be more in keeping with the style of the community,” said another email, referring to the different rusty brown hues of the doors.

“If you do not comply, you will be liable to fines and legal remedies,” the letter concluded.

Pointing out the rather eclectic array of homes surrounding it, Good asked, “Just so I’m clear, what’s the definition of neighborhood-compliant design? No response came.

HOA board members did not return calls seeking comment on this article.

Hare argues that painting the metal marbled brown would destroy its reason for existing – a raw, natural look. Besides, he added, the paint would peel off soon.

“Let’s be real here – there’s nothing offensive about these doors,” Hare said. “It’s not like they’re painted with geometric patterns and polka dots. They’re organic and pleasing to the eye.”

Good said the HOA never asked her about other changes she made, such as repainting the exterior and redesigning the front yard with succulents.

“We only pay the HOA $ 125 per month,” Good said. “Its main function is to maintain the hillsides.

Former HOA board member Elinor Silverstein agreed with this assessment, describing the neighborhood association as “easy going.”

“Honestly, the association is not nitpicking,” said Silverstein. “Our houses are not all the same. We are not Irvine.

Stressing that she does not speak for the council, the longtime resident said she had no idea why Good had run into traps. “I think these doors are the coolest,” she said. “But (Good) had to skip an important step. There is a process that you go through.

Good has said her case will likely end in mediation, so, at a minimum, she has a few weeks to enjoy her $ 23,000 makeover before the next battle.

“I’m joking that I’ll cover my doors with cheap plastic tablecloths so they’re a solid color,” Good said.

Hare bristles with controversy over something he helped fashion. “I feel like I have to defend Julie,” he said. “It’s almost harassment. Its doors are spectacular. What’s the big deal?

“At the end of the day,” he said, “we’re just talking about garage doors. “


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CAMCO Homeowners Association Leadership Uses Virtual Education to Guide and Support HOA Board Members https://sahara-acaps.org/camco-homeowners-association-leadership-uses-virtual-education-to-guide-and-support-hoa-board-members/ https://sahara-acaps.org/camco-homeowners-association-leadership-uses-virtual-education-to-guide-and-support-hoa-board-members/#respond Wed, 28 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/camco-homeowners-association-leadership-uses-virtual-education-to-guide-and-support-hoa-board-members/ {Board 101 Training Well Received, Long-Time HOA Leadership Leader To Expand Virtual Education Services To Help More HOA Board Members} CAMCO (Complete Association Management Company, LLC) recently launched its online training program, Board 101 Training, to educate board members of homeowner associations about their roles and responsibilities within their associations. For years, CAMCO has hosted […]]]>


{Board 101 Training Well Received, Long-Time HOA Leadership Leader To Expand Virtual Education Services To Help More HOA Board Members}

CAMCO (Complete Association Management Company, LLC) recently launched its online training program, Board 101 Training, to educate board members of homeowner associations about their roles and responsibilities within their associations.

For years, CAMCO has hosted an annual trade show bringing together its preferred suppliers and board members from HOAs managed by CAMCO. During the meeting, CAMCO also hosted a training seminar for HOA board members. This year, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the show, titled “Purple Rain” in honor of the American Cancer Society’s “Power in Purple” fundraising efforts, has been canceled. The Board 101 online training replaced the in-person educational component of the show.

“It’s training that benefits board members and helps them understand their duties and roles. This is especially useful for a newly elected person who has not served on the board in the past, ”said Mary Rendina, Marketing Director of CAMCO. “We didn’t want to have a Zoom meeting because it is and it’s done. We wanted to present something that they could revisit at their own pace and revisit the topic, if necessary.

With Board 101, CAMCO offers four virtual training modules. They understand:

Roles and responsibilities: presented by Cyndi Koester, CMCA®, AMS®, ​​PCAM® Division Director, Portfolio

Governance: presented by Mozell Williams, Vice President, Developer Association Services

Finances: presented by Yvette Sauceda, Accounting Director

Meetings, interviews and committees: presented by Christine Greengrass, CMCA®, AMS®, ​​PCAM® Vice-president, Services to associations

Participants can choose to download the course materials or have hard copies provided by their community manager. After viewing the videos, they can email questions and have them personally answered by the video instructor.

“I actually prefer online rather than in person because it’s a much better use of time, eliminating travel and [we] can navigate according to our individual pace, ”said Barbara Holden, HOA board member for a CAMCO-managed community in Nevada. Holden was also impressed with the speaker’s level of knowledge in the Meetings, Interview and Committees video.

CAMCO hired a professional videographer to create the presentations. With the first modules well received, the team is also creating additional educational videos. The next module will cover how to properly complete architectural review requests.

“It’s a common subject that we come across. Often people submit requests and are turned down because they did not fill them out correctly, ”Rendina added.

Profits from this year’s show sponsors support the American Cancer Society. With the show canceled, this year’s sponsors have chosen to have funds to cover the costs of video production. Anything over the amount of production was donated to the American Cancer Society.

CAMCO operates over 300 HOAs in Nevada. To learn more, visit https://camconevada.com or search @CAMCONevada on Facebook.

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SC Private Island Owners Association Received Federal Rescue Funds Amid Pandemic | Business https://sahara-acaps.org/sc-private-island-owners-association-received-federal-rescue-funds-amid-pandemic-business/ https://sahara-acaps.org/sc-private-island-owners-association-received-federal-rescue-funds-amid-pandemic-business/#respond Thu, 04 Jun 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/sc-private-island-owners-association-received-federal-rescue-funds-amid-pandemic-business/ The group of owners of another private island near Charleston – Dewees Island – have accepted money from the federal bailout fund intended to help small businesses and nonprofits financially damaged by the coronavirus pandemic. An email obtained by The Post and Courier shows that the Dewees Homeowners Association, North Charleston, received a loan of […]]]>


The group of owners of another private island near Charleston – Dewees Island – have accepted money from the federal bailout fund intended to help small businesses and nonprofits financially damaged by the coronavirus pandemic.

An email obtained by The Post and Courier shows that the Dewees Homeowners Association, North Charleston, received a loan of $ 218,315 from the Paycheck Protection Program of the US Small Business Administration.

The group is not the first local homeowner or homeowner association to operate the emergency loan program, to which Congress has allocated $ 649 billion.

Kiawah Island, south of Charleston, also received funding through its private community association, but then returned the money following the public outcry.

The Dewees association is eligible because of its association status. But he’s already facing the same public backlash as Kiawah.

Wendell Reilly, chairman of the group, said the association’s board and members will meet later this month to consider repaying the loan.

U.S. Representative Joe Cunningham, a Democrat from Charleston who represents South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District, called on landowners association leaders to do just that.

“P3 loans were designed to help small businesses stay afloat and keep paychecks for their employees, not for wealthy community associations with millions of dollars in reserve,” Cunningham said in a statement on ‘Dewees money.

“This money should be returned so that it can help struggling small businesses in our community get through this unprecedented health and economic crisis,” he added.

Cunningham isn’t the only one who thinks the loan is an inappropriate use of federal funding. Several of the Republican candidates vying for Cunningham’s seat this year are also opposed to the group’s use of the loan, which can be completely waived by the federal government if used to cover salary costs.

“I can’t imagine why the PPP funds should go to an association of owners, corporations or Ivy League schools because the funds were intended to help small businesses,” said Nancy Mace, a lawmaker. of the state running for the seat of Congress.

Kiawah Island Community Association Secures $ 1 Million Federal Coronavirus Loan

“It shows why Congress desperately needs an adult in the room with my financial expertise to identify issues like this before taxpayers are forced to pay millions, billions or even billions of billions of garbage. added Kathy Landing, a Mount Pleasant board member who is also competing for the Republican nomination.

Dewees is a secluded community just north of the Isle of Palms and can only be accessed by a private ferry. The real estate association, according to its most recent financial report, represents approximately 129 landowners on the 1,206-acre island.

News of the loan was included in an email sent to association members in May.

The post explained that David Dew, the association’s chief executive, applied for the loan in early April as small businesses across the country scrambled for federal funding. The group received the money in mid-May during the second round of funding for the loan program.

The association sent another email to islanders on Thursday after receiving questions from The Post and Courier. In it, Reilly explained why the association’s leadership chose to ask for the money in the first place.

He said the funds were needed as the island’s ferry service revenue declined in March and April, and spending increased due to safety precautions the group implemented in response to COVID-19 .

“With the support of the board of directors, the manager of the island requested relief through the PPP loan cancellation program because we were concerned at the time about the safety of our staff and the operation of the ferry from. the island, ”Reilly wrote. “We are a small business with less than 25 full-time employees, and the immediate financial impact of COVID-19 was real to us.”

Charleston Private Schools Get Millions in Federal Government Coronavirus Loans

The association generates most of its income from property, ferry and rental fees, according to its financial reports. Between September 2018 and September 2019, the group received approximately $ 1.9 million in revenue from these fees, but spent more than $ 2 million during the year on repairs, insurance and employee salaries.

During the same period, the real estate association also expanded its reserve fund, which is intended to finance projects on the island, from $ 2.1 million to $ 2.5 million.

The group did not say how much it lost due to the drop in the number of passengers on its ferry in March and April. But in the last fiscal year, the group raised $ 144,059 from this service.

Reilly pointed out that the group was unquestionably eligible for the federal loan, but suggested that he might choose to repay the loan in the near future. He also acknowledged that other small businesses may have suffered more from the pandemic.

“We take seriously our responsibility as the beneficiary of the CARES Act relief and will consider the implications of conserving PPP funds in a thoughtful manner,” Reilly told The Post and Courier.

Taxpayers and members of the public have not been able to obtain a complete list of businesses, corporations and nonprofits that have received PPP loans at this point.

President Donald Trump’s administration has refused to release the names of the recipients, and it is in the process of being pursued by several media, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal for access to this information.

The US House also tried to pass a bill last week that would require the SBA to disclose these records. The effort was thwarted by 146 Republicans, including the entire Republican delegation from South Carolina, which voted to keep the information private.

Our bi-weekly newsletter features all of the business stories that shape Charleston and South Carolina. Get ahead with us – it’s free.


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Sea Gate residents sue homeowners association over financial disclosure • Brooklyn Paper https://sahara-acaps.org/sea-gate-residents-sue-homeowners-association-over-financial-disclosure-brooklyn-paper/ https://sahara-acaps.org/sea-gate-residents-sue-homeowners-association-over-financial-disclosure-brooklyn-paper/#respond Tue, 02 Jun 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/sea-gate-residents-sue-homeowners-association-over-financial-disclosure-brooklyn-paper/ Subscribe to our Policy NewsletterNY for the latest coverage and to stay informed about the 2021 elections in your district and across New York Three residents of a south Brooklyn gated community are suing their homeowners association in court to force release of its financial records – claiming there is more than $ 5.1 million […]]]>


Subscribe to our Policy NewsletterNY for the latest coverage and to stay informed about the 2021 elections in your district and across New York

Three residents of a south Brooklyn gated community are suing their homeowners association in court to force release of its financial records – claiming there is more than $ 5.1 million in discrepancies between tax returns governing body and financial statements over four years.

The owners say the Sea Gate Association – which manages the Sea Gate community on the western tip of Coney Island – inconsistently recorded its income from government grants and spending on construction projects, among others, between 2015 and 2018.

“It doesn’t provide correct information, it hides information and falsifies information,” said Gary Daniels, a Sea Gate resident, who said board members were not open about their finances. “You can’t get answers from them.”

The Sea Gate Association, a 501 (c) 4 nonprofit run by volunteers elected every two years, collects fees from landlords to fund garbage collection, a small police force, infrastructure repairs and other services in the community of 4,000 people.

Since Storm Sandy devastated Sea Gate in 2012, the organization has also received tens of millions of dollars in government grants for storm resilience projects, the association’s president said.

“We have brought over $ 60 million to our community so far,” said David Wynn, an owner who has been with the association for over 10 years.

The repairs include a $ 4.8 million bulkhead and a new sewer system that is well under construction. But several residents say that the association’s refusal to make its finances public, as well as the inconsistent files, raise questions about the association’s projects and finances.

Daniels and a small group of other owners began reviewing Sea Gate’s finances after attending a public meeting in 2018 on the association’s financial statements from the previous year, which Daniels said struck him as odd. .

“Frankly, something about the 2017 financials didn’t smell right,” said Daniels, financial consultant and longtime Sea Gate resident.

Daniels had access to the association’s tax returns and financial statements between 2015 and 2018, and noted discrepancies between the separate returns. While the association’s total expenses and revenues have remained fairly consistent from document to document, the original tax returns tended not to list large amounts paid to independent contractors, legal fees, or expenses. amounts that the association has received in the form of government grants. Sometimes the statements listed some of these numbers in separate sections, such as “insurance collection income”.

Following Daniels’ criticism, the association amended its 2016 and 2017 tax returns, revealing some of the flaws in its previous reports. For example, the original 2017 return mentioned $ 275,011 in insurance recovery, while the amended return mentioned no insurance recovery and $ 643,320 in government grants instead. The original statement also made no mention of any independent contractors paid more than $ 100,000, while the revised statement listed four contractors who received $ 800,270 in total.

“They mislabel money. They move it, ”Daniels said, adding that many of the maneuvers are“ 100% illegal ”.

As a non-profit association, the association does not pay taxes and its tax returns are for informational purposes only. But Daniels said the inconsistent deposits help hide the association’s income and expenses.

“A lot of people are playing around with their tax returns. But it’s a $ 5.1 million difference, ”he said.

The association, however, said the differences in returns are minor – especially since all of the documents report the same amount of total costs and revenue.

“[The accountants] amended [the return] to read that one plus one is two, rather than one plus one plus one equals three, ”said Barbara Garafalo, a board member for about 16 years. “Our accountant certified our audits. We were audited and they never found anything wrong.

Board members added that the state is closely monitoring funding for government-funded projects, such as the bulkhead project.

“The grants don’t just get to us, we have to disburse funds and we get reimbursed,” Garafalo said. “It’s not like we got money for grants. No one is throwing money at us.

After seeing the discrepancies, Daniels and two other residents, Olga and Vincent Scarcella, asked in December that the association submit the minutes of its management meetings as well as hundreds of documents concerning most of the finances of the association. over several years – citing a law require homeowner associations to authorize owners to view minutes and records upon request.

At a meeting in January, board members told the three owners they could see some documents, but would have to sign a nondisclosure agreement first. Protesters refused to sign it.

“I’ve seen NDAs before, and it’s an NDA that you can barely breathe,” Daniels said.

Chairman David Wynn has defended nondisclosure agreements, saying all board members sign them and they serve to prevent owners from blowing up sensitive documents on social media.

“The reason is that in this day and age of what’s going on on social media, we’re running a business at the end of the day,” Wynn said. “If people think we are doing something wrong, they can look at the books and go to the authorities. “

Wynn added that the association is willing to show the protesters’ documents, but cannot hand over hundreds at a time, especially since lawsuits with the owners are confidential. Daniels and the Scarcellas argued that they could sift through documents on the association’s computer or look in boxes of papers.

Olga Scarcella filed a show cause order at the end of February, which would oblige the association to hand over the requested documents to the owners. The hearing has been postponed due to the coronavirus outbreak and is postponed until June 25, Daniels said.


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