Homeowners association – Sahara Acaps http://sahara-acaps.org/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 08:24:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sahara-acaps.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-59-120x120.png Homeowners association – Sahara Acaps http://sahara-acaps.org/ 32 32 HOA dropped solar panel lawsuits after Belleville couple spent thousands fighting it https://sahara-acaps.org/hoa-dropped-solar-panel-lawsuits-after-belleville-couple-spent-thousands-fighting-it/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/hoa-dropped-solar-panel-lawsuits-after-belleville-couple-spent-thousands-fighting-it/ A Belleville couple won a court victory when their homeowners association dropped a lawsuit against them for installing rooftop solar panels on the front and back of their home. But Mark Bassler said he and his wife, Jennifer, had “mixed feelings”. The couple recently learned that The Orchards Homeowners Association (HOA) last month asked to […]]]>

A Belleville couple won a court victory when their homeowners association dropped a lawsuit against them for installing rooftop solar panels on the front and back of their home.

But Mark Bassler said he and his wife, Jennifer, had “mixed feelings”.

The couple recently learned that The Orchards Homeowners Association (HOA) last month asked to dismiss a 2020 civil case in St. Clair County Circuit Court “with prejudice,” meaning they could file a another complaint in the future. The motion did not give a reason.

“We’re glad the stress is gone, even though they may sue us for the way they dismissed it,” said Mark Bassler, 40, a former Belleville firefighter and father of two. 2 and 7 years old.

“But their policy was illegal, and there was no reason for them to drop (the lawsuit) at that time, unless they knew they were going to lose and they had to pay our costs. legal.”

Those fees total $53,000, Mark Bassler said.

The Orchards is a subdivision with an 18-hole golf course off Green Mount Road in Belleville. His HOA has a volunteer three-member board of directors that approves or rejects improvement projects affecting home exteriors and yards.

Association attorney Mike Wagner of Clayborne & Wagner in Belleville did not respond to a request for comment on the lawsuit this week.

Natalie Stinson of Pinnacle HOA Management, which managed The Orchards HOA for most of the litigation, declined to comment. She referred Community Property Management questions to O’Fallon, who took over day-to-day management of the HOA several months ago. His manager could not immediately be reached.

In this 2021 file photo, Jennifer and Mark Bassler are shown outside their home on Fairway Drive in Belleville. The Orchards Homeowners Association recently filed for dismissal of a lawsuit regarding their solar panels.

Almost two years of litigation

The Orchards HOA filed a lawsuit in December 2020. It argued the Basslers violated subdivision rules that allow solar panels only on rear-facing roofs for aesthetic reasons and sued the installation after the council rejected their plan.

“(The Illinois Homeowners’ Energy Police Statement Act) allows an HOA to determine the specific location where a rooftop solar power system may be installed in a southerly orientation or less than 45 degrees east or west of the south provided the determination does not impair the efficient operation of the solar power system,” the complaint stated.

The Basslers argued that the 2011 law protected their right to place solar panels wherever they were needed to be fully efficient, saving them money on electricity costs and helping the environment.

Peoria attorney John Albers, a solar specialist, originally represented the couple. After leaving his practice for another job, the Great Rivers Environmental Law Center in St. Louis took over in January 2022.

The nonprofit center provides free legal services to individuals and organizations seeking to protect the environment and public health, according to attorney Bruce Morrison.

Morrison called The Orchards HOA’s motion to deny last month “bittersweet.”

“Our board of directors decided that we would take up the case and represent the Basslers in an effort to set a precedent in Illinois that the HOA was unlawfully obstructing the installation of a solar system,” he said. declared. “So as a legal center, we’re disappointed that we’re not banging our heads there.”

The Orchards HOA was the first homeowners association in Illinois to sue residents for solar panels, according to Albers.

This photo shows solar panels on the roof of the Bassler house at The Orchards in Belleville, seen from the street.  The homeowners association argued that they violated subdivision rules.

This photo shows solar panels on the roof of the Bassler house at The Orchards in Belleville, seen from the street. The homeowners association argued that they violated subdivision rules.

100% of the electricity produced

The Basslers purchased their two-story home with white siding and a brick facade on Fairway Drive in March 2020. Mark, then a Belleville firefighter, had to live in the city due to department residency requirements, and the couple wanted that their children attend Mascoutah District School, where Jennifer teaches.

Orchards do the trick.

EFS Energy in St. Louis installed the Basslers solar system in December 2020. It consists of 23 rooftop solar panels in the back (west) and 12 in the front (east).

EFS owner Paul McKnight submitted an affidavit supporting the couple’s motion to dismiss The Orchards HOA lawsuit in 2021. St. Clair County Circuit Court Associate Judge Julie Katz dismissed the query.

“If the Basslers can only install panels on the back roof of their home, the efficiency of their solar power system will drop by about 35%,” McKnight wrote in his affidavit.

The Basslers spent about $40,000 to purchase and install the solar system and recouped all but about $15,000 through grants, rebates and other government incentives, according to Mark Bassler.

Solar panels now provide 100% of their electricity, he said. The only cost is a monthly meter fee of $12.

The Basslers try to figure out how to deal with their $53,000 debt to the Peoria law firm that first represented them. Mark Bassler was fired as a Belleville firefighter in May. He said he has not returned to work since a work-related back injury in February 2021 that required multiple surgeries and other medical attention that depleted the couple’s savings.

“People have come up to us and said, ‘Hey, why don’t you start a GoFundMe? ‘” Mark Bassler said. “I struggled with health and the solar lawsuit, and we don’t have the $53,000. But my wife and I think there are people in the world who are worse off than us.

“We are hard working people. We are honest people. We are neighbors and we want to help our neighborhood. That’s why we didn’t sue (the HOA). We didn’t want to waste the neighborhood’s money.

Editor’s note: This story has been updated to reflect that a new company, Community Property Management, has taken over management of The Orchards HOA.

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The Carlton Square Homeowners Association is fed up with the litter left behind by the concert and stadium spectators https://sahara-acaps.org/the-carlton-square-homeowners-association-is-fed-up-with-the-litter-left-behind-by-the-concert-and-stadium-spectators/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/the-carlton-square-homeowners-association-is-fed-up-with-the-litter-left-behind-by-the-concert-and-stadium-spectators/ Inglewood Mayor James Butts is regularly observed walking around the town daily, giving him an overview of what the town looks like to passers-by. He is, however, “Ray Charles” to the trash left by attendees leaving SoFi Stadium and the Kia Forum that is part of his normal walking route. The HOA treasurer attended the […]]]>

Inglewood Mayor James Butts is regularly observed walking around the town daily, giving him an overview of what the town looks like to passers-by. He is, however, “Ray Charles” to the trash left by attendees leaving SoFi Stadium and the Kia Forum that is part of his normal walking route.

The HOA treasurer attended the October 18 regular city council meeting to explain to the city that it is not the responsibility of gate communities to pick up trash left on their property.

Photo courtesy of an Inglewood resident

“I’m here asking for help,” said Phyllis Gillian. “When they have concerts at the Forum and games at SoFi Stadium, they [attendees] leaving rubbish all over our property and we can’t ask anyone to help us remove the rubbish and we don’t think we should be financially responsible for doing so when we are not the ones enjoying the benefits of it all.

“We want the City to help us with the Forum and the stadium to clean up trash around our property, we never had that before both opened,” Gillian said. “It looks like a fucking ghetto when they leave and we need help.”

The mayor asked for the exact location of the trash can she was referring to.

“It’s right along Manchester, Pincay and Kareem Court, which is the grassy part surrounding the property where they dump rubbish there when the cans are full,” Gillian said.

He then asked how long he was staying there because that was his walking route and “he hadn’t noticed”.

“We just had our landscape cleaned up, but most of the time it’s there forever because no one is cleaning it up,” Gillian said.

Photo courtesy of an Inglewood resident

The mayor said he would “talk” to SoFi about it, but Gillian said the Forum also needed to be addressed.

“When these people pitch their tents, they have food and things they leave behind,” Gillian said.

“I definitely see the tents on Kareem Court when they’re there to get their tickets,” Butts said.

Councilor Dionne Faulk also intervened on the issue of waste.

“I’ve worked very, very closely with our public works department because the Renaissance community has also expressed concerns about waste,” Faulk said. “We picked up trash collection and worked with our team on major thoroughfares around SoFi Stadium after each event.”

“It’s a concern of all gated communities,” Faulk said.

Faulk is also a resident of Renaissance.

Butts then asked Deputy City Manager Luis Atwell about a contracted service the city uses to clean up after events and if they still use that service.

“No Mayor, we don’t use that service, we use public works forces,” said Atwell, who is also director of public works. “The problem was that it was $10,000 after each event, which comes out to $50,000-$60,000 a week.”

The council continues to praise the so-called “financial benefits” that come with the opening of the Kia Forum and SoFi Stadium, but the financial burden continues to fall on the backs of residents.

According to the stadium petition approved by the board in February 2015, admission tax revenue is capped at $15 million per year, which is absorbed by costs associated with law enforcement, traffic and firefighters. The agreement does not provide additional resources for garbage collection.

The agreement called for Hollywood Park Co. to bear signage costs related to the citywide parking permit program, however, the general fund paid for it through an interdepartmental fund transfer to the authority. parking.

When exactly will the people of Inglewood see the benefits of the stadium?

Mayor Butts’ campaign slogan is “promises kept, results you can see,” but obviously, we’re not looking at the same picture.

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Unique partnership between Homeowners Association and Concert Golf Partners leads to acquisition of Marsh Landing Country Club https://sahara-acaps.org/unique-partnership-between-homeowners-association-and-concert-golf-partners-leads-to-acquisition-of-marsh-landing-country-club/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/unique-partnership-between-homeowners-association-and-concert-golf-partners-leads-to-acquisition-of-marsh-landing-country-club/ PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Florida., October 13, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Concert Golf Partners (“Concert Golf”) recently completed its 28th private club acquisition (its seventh in the past 12 months), with the purchase of Marsh Landing Country Club. In the 1980s, fame Jacksonville developer, Chester Stokescreated the Marsh Landing community, comprising over 1,100 homes within the gated […]]]>

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Florida., October 13, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Concert Golf Partners (“Concert Golf”) recently completed its 28th private club acquisition (its seventh in the past 12 months), with the purchase of Marsh Landing Country Club. In the 1980s, fame Jacksonville developer, Chester Stokescreated the Marsh Landing community, comprising over 1,100 homes within the gated community, and anchored by a much-loved Ed Seay (Arnold Palmer) designed golf course.

Concert Golf Partners Marsh Landing Country Club Logo

In addition to its championship golf course (ranked among the top five in North Florida), Marsh Landing also features ten lighted Har-Tru tennis courts, a large fitness center, and a resort-style swimming pool popular with members of all ages. “A unique element of this transaction has been the involvement of the owners, which has helped us approach the developer with a creative win-win solution and will enable us to invest ~$7.0 million high-impact improvements in the years to come. Our alignment with the HOA has been critical throughout this process…to ensure that we meet the needs and desired outcomes of all stakeholders,” said Matthew HobbinsVice President at Concert Golf.

Greg Neal, president of the Masters Association (which governs the 10+ sub-HOAs) described the complexities residents faced and their desire to have an expert like Concert Golf Partners at the helm in the future. “We needed a solution to a complex situation. We needed to identify an owner-operator that more than 1,100 owners could rally behind and work with to ensure a bright future for our community. Less than a third of our residents were club members, so we had to get creative… Concert Golf worked with us to develop a solution that delivers value to every resident – ​​not just the club members who would benefit from the millions of dollars in country club improvements We considered every conceivable alternative, including months of interviewing several prominent owner-operators and management companies if the HOA had exercised its right to purchase the club.After much deliberation, we presented the proposal for Concert Golf to our community and the response was a resounding “YES”, with a strong 92% of the 800 owners who attended, a rec order of electoral participation.”

The developer had options, given the desirability of real estate within the community: (a) develop additional lots within the community which would likely have encroached upon the club; or (b) leave the development entirely by selling the club and moving on to other activities. Developer and club owner, Chester Stokescommented, “I was thrilled to see the community reaction to Concert Golf, so the decision was much easier knowing that my neighbors and friends had my back.”

Peter NanulaCEO of Concert Golf, said: “Over the years, the trend has become increasingly clear: members prefer to simply enjoy the clubs they have joined, without having to oversee funding and day-to-day operations. The 1,100 owners proved it once again. . They recognized that a high quality professional operator with a strong balance sheet would provide insurance for the future. Developers also enjoy passing the baton to others who will make it their full-time effort.

Concert Golf Partners is a boutique-owner-operator of the finest private golf and country clubs, established in 2011 by Peter Nanulafounder and CEO of Arnold Palmer Golf Management in the 1990s, and chief operating officer Susan Dunnavant. Concert Golf raised $250 million of patient and sustainable equity to invest in private clubs. Concert Golf is also unique for its ability to preserve the identity and traditions of historic clubs. Concert Golf’s boutique collection of premium clubs now has 26 clubs nationwide, including the two former clubs owned by developers like The Club at Longview in Charlotte and Gaillardia Country Club at Oklahoma City as well as long-time member-owned clubs such as White Manor Country Club in philadelphia cream and the Muttontown Club on Long Island.

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See original content to download multimedia: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/unique-partnership-between-homeowners-association-and-concert-golf-partners-leads-to-the-acquisition-of -marsh-landing-country-club-301648930.html

SOURCE Concert Golf Partners

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Scottsdale Homeowners Association Trials No Overseeding and Sees Major Benefits https://sahara-acaps.org/scottsdale-homeowners-association-trials-no-overseeding-and-sees-major-benefits/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 01:16:29 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/scottsdale-homeowners-association-trials-no-overseeding-and-sees-major-benefits/ Scottsdale Homeowners Association Trials No Overseeding and Sees Major Benefits SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – The city of Scottsdale has a new initiative to save water, and they’re asking all residents and businesses to keep watch this fall. Overseeding means you add grass seed to lawns to fill in bare spots or create a lusher look. Of […]]]>

The city of Scottsdale has a new initiative to save water, and they’re asking all residents and businesses to keep watch this fall.

Overseeding means you add grass seed to lawns to fill in bare spots or create a lusher look. Of course, you have to water them a little more for them to grow.

One Home Owners Association (HOA) notably put this practice to the test last season to see if it worked well, and it was a huge success.

Typically, homeowners and HOAs supervised in September and October, but this time last year a Scottsdale Homeowners Association opted out and they were able to save 1.5 million gallons of water. .

“This year, it’s about $3,200 for winter seeding. So if you think about it, if we don’t do the winter seeding for this season, we’ll save $3,200, plus we’ll save on water,” said Paul Traiforos, president of the Montage Homeowners Association.

He says they decided not to overseed last fall and the benefits are both financial and environmental. Scottsdale Water hopes more HOAs will follow.

Bill Casenhiser is a Water Conservation Specialist for the City of Scottsdale and says, “As a city, we’re asking all of our customers to reduce their water use by 5% now.

The city’s current initiative asks others not to delay as we enter the season. All of this is happening as Arizona faces drought, as does the Colorado River.

Scottsdale Water reports that on average, 70% of water used in residences is used outside the home, so it’s imperative to try to reduce now.

“Constantly in a struggle trying to keep the water where the water needs to be,” Casenhiser says.

A small gesture like choosing not to overseed this fall makes a big difference.

“I’ve been on the HOA board since 2008, so I know a lot of neighbors. Everyone is really behind us, we’re doing this for the environment, for the community and for the state,” Traiforos said. .

The HOA says they plan to skip overseeding each season. Scottsdale Parks and Recreation says it is leading by example and reducing overseeding in city parks.

Related reports:

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Scottsdale Homeowners Association Trials No Overseeding and Sees Major Benefits https://sahara-acaps.org/scottsdale-homeowners-association-trials-no-overseeding-and-sees-major-benefits-2/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/scottsdale-homeowners-association-trials-no-overseeding-and-sees-major-benefits-2/ Scottsdale Homeowners Association Trials No Overseeding and Sees Major Benefits SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – The city of Scottsdale has a new initiative to save water, and they’re asking all residents and businesses to keep watch this fall. Overseeding means you add grass seed to lawns to fill in bare spots or create a lusher look. Of […]]]>

The city of Scottsdale has a new initiative to save water, and they’re asking all residents and businesses to keep watch this fall.

Overseeding means you add grass seed to lawns to fill in bare spots or create a lusher look. Of course, you have to water them a little more for them to grow.

One Home Owners Association (HOA) notably put this practice to the test last season to see if it worked well, and it was a huge success.

Typically, homeowners and HOAs supervised in September and October, but this time last year a Scottsdale Homeowners Association opted out and they were able to save 1.5 million gallons of water. .

“This year, it’s about $3,200 for winter seeding. So if you think about it, if we don’t do the winter seeding for this season, we’ll save $3,200, plus we’ll save on water,” said Paul Traiforos, president of the Montage Homeowners Association.

He says they decided not to overseed last fall and the benefits are both financial and environmental. Scottsdale Water hopes more HOAs will follow.

Bill Casenhiser is a Water Conservation Specialist for the City of Scottsdale and says, “As a city, we’re asking all of our customers to reduce their water use by 5% now.

The city’s current initiative asks others not to delay as we enter the season. All of this is happening as Arizona faces drought, as does the Colorado River.

Scottsdale Water reports that on average, 70% of water used in residences is used outside the home, so it’s imperative to try to reduce now.

“Constantly in a struggle trying to keep the water where the water needs to be,” Casenhiser says.

A small gesture like choosing not to overseed this fall makes a big difference.

“I’ve been on the HOA board since 2008, so I know a lot of neighbors. Everyone is really behind us, we’re doing this for the environment, for the community and for the state,” Traiforos said. .

The HOA says they plan to skip overseeding each season. Scottsdale Parks and Recreation says it is leading by example and reducing overseeding in city parks.

Related reports:

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Alabama family refuses to remove American flag despite request from homeowners association https://sahara-acaps.org/alabama-family-refuses-to-remove-american-flag-despite-request-from-homeowners-association/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/alabama-family-refuses-to-remove-american-flag-despite-request-from-homeowners-association/ A Huntsville family says their homeowners association told them to remove their American flag and the US Army flag, as well as the pole where the two fly outside their home. WAAY reports that Jill and Anthony Hudnell were ordered by the Homeowners Association of Lake Forest to remove their flagpole because it did not […]]]>

A Huntsville family says their homeowners association told them to remove their American flag and the US Army flag, as well as the pole where the two fly outside their home.

WAAY reports that Jill and Anthony Hudnell were ordered by the Homeowners Association of Lake Forest to remove their flagpole because it did not comply with association terms and restrictions.

“My reaction was, no, it’s going to stay,” Jill Hudnell told FOX News.

According to the Hudnells, their landscaper contacted the HOA in July, leaving messages, before the mast was installed. The messages were never returned, so the mast was installed.

On September 1, the family received a letter from the HOA, requesting its immediate removal.

According to the HOA, no flag poles other than those mounted on a house and less than 4 feet may be placed in the community without prior written permission. Owners can submit a written request before adding structures to their yards, which the association has 30 days to review.

Hudnell said her father was a Marine Corps Vietnam veteran who lost his leg and became an aeronautical engineer. Her husband served in the army and her brother-in-law in the navy.

“This flag means a lot,” she said. “We also have the army flag… And those two flags will stay up there.”

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Alabama family refuses to remove American flag despite request from homeowners association https://sahara-acaps.org/alabama-family-refuses-to-remove-american-flag-despite-request-from-homeowners-association-2/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/alabama-family-refuses-to-remove-american-flag-despite-request-from-homeowners-association-2/ A Huntsville family says their homeowners association told them to remove their American flag and the US Army flag, as well as the pole where the two fly outside their home. WAAY reports that Jill and Anthony Hudnell were ordered by the Homeowners Association of Lake Forest to remove their flagpole because it did not […]]]>

A Huntsville family says their homeowners association told them to remove their American flag and the US Army flag, as well as the pole where the two fly outside their home.

WAAY reports that Jill and Anthony Hudnell were ordered by the Homeowners Association of Lake Forest to remove their flagpole because it did not comply with association terms and restrictions.

“My reaction was, no, it’s going to stay,” Jill Hudnell told FOX News.

According to the Hudnells, their landscaper contacted the HOA in July, leaving messages, before the mast was installed. The messages were never returned, so the mast was installed.

On September 1, the family received a letter from the HOA, requesting its immediate removal.

According to the HOA, no flag poles other than those mounted on a house and less than 4 feet may be placed in the community without prior written permission. Owners can submit a written request before adding structures to their yards, which the association has 30 days to review.

Hudnell said her father was a Marine Corps Vietnam veteran who lost his leg and became an aeronautical engineer. Her husband served in the army and her brother-in-law in the navy.

“This flag means a lot,” she said. “We also have the army flag… And those two flags will stay up there.”

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Homeowners Association president accused of hiding camera in Flagler’s condo https://sahara-acaps.org/homeowners-association-president-accused-of-hiding-camera-in-flaglers-condo/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 17:31:39 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/homeowners-association-president-accused-of-hiding-camera-in-flaglers-condo/ FLAGLER COUNTY, Florida. – The president of the Homeowners Association of the Las Brisas Condo Association in the Matanzas Shores community was arrested on allegations that he installed a hidden camera inside the master bedroom of a condominium, according to the office of the Flagler County Sheriff. Robert Orr, 59, turned himself in Tuesday night, […]]]>

FLAGLER COUNTY, Florida. – The president of the Homeowners Association of the Las Brisas Condo Association in the Matanzas Shores community was arrested on allegations that he installed a hidden camera inside the master bedroom of a condominium, according to the office of the Flagler County Sheriff.

Robert Orr, 59, turned himself in Tuesday night, heading to the Flagler County Jail.

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Deputies said a woman called the sheriff’s office on Aug. 30 after a weekend at the condo. As the woman was packing to leave, she said she discovered a hidden camera in a flowerpot in the master bedroom, according to a press release.

Investigators said they found video on the camera showing two people “in various stages of undressing”, including the woman who filed the report. Deputies said there was also video of Orr testing the camera in his own flat before it was placed in the flowerpot.

The condo owner told investigators she gave Orr access to the apartment to check on her condition because she lives out of state, according to the statement.

Deputies said they found several other “spy cameras” and other electronic devices at Orr’s home, and they are being examined.

“I urge anyone who allowed Orr into their home unattended to check secret recording devices and to contact us immediately if they find anything suspicious,” Sheriff Rick Staly said in a statement. “At this time, the evidence suggests that Robert Orr acted alone.”

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Orr faces four counts of video voyeurism.

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Los Alamos is not a homeowners association – Los Alamos Reporter https://sahara-acaps.org/los-alamos-is-not-a-homeowners-association-los-alamos-reporter/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 12:49:02 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/los-alamos-is-not-a-homeowners-association-los-alamos-reporter/ BY ELIZABETH CHURCH I am writing to comment on the county’s proposed changes to the nuisance code. I write on behalf of myself and others who reside in this beautiful setting but do not enjoy the high wages and extraordinary benefits paid to LANL workers. I am a writer. On average, writers in this country […]]]>

BY ELIZABETH CHURCH

I am writing to comment on the county’s proposed changes to the nuisance code. I write on behalf of myself and others who reside in this beautiful setting but do not enjoy the high wages and extraordinary benefits paid to LANL workers. I am a writer. On average, writers in this country earn $20,000 a year. Others who live here – and contribute to the rich fabric of this city – are teachers and nurses, grocers, childcare providers, arborists and carpenters. The proposed code will have a serious negative impact on seniors and others living on fixed incomes.

Los Alamos is not a homeowners association, yet the code reads as if it is. Much attention has already been paid to the proposed code’s snobby approach to home auto repairs. Other aspects of the code as proposed have not received as much attention, such as the provision that would prohibit homeowners from keeping an upholstered chair or sofa on a covered porch – the code specifies that this type of non-waterproof furniture would be prohibited. That’s not to say if the furniture is in good condition or comfortable for someone who just wants to sit and watch the world go by. Instead, it pretty precisely defines the type of furniture an individual can keep on the porch. If it’s shabby, vermin-infested furniture left to rot, that’s another matter. The code makes no distinction.

And what should a homeowner do when the exterior paint starts to peel – which will happen in our climate? The paint — not the best paint — currently costs $50 a gallon. The cost of paying someone to paint is even more prohibitive. What does someone who doesn’t brag about a $100,000 salary do when code enforcers spot a violation? What does an elderly person with limited income do? What does a teacher or a nurse or a social worker or a store clerk do when they are already faced with childcare costs, uncovered medical expenses, food and utility expenses? Does the county really want to force residents to choose between paying their medical bills and making sure no peeling paint is visible? Does the county then intend to dictate what colors someone can paint their house?

The building code enforcement section of local government has come under intense scrutiny in the courts. Recently, a company I used to patronize in Albuquerque for years indicated that they would no longer install windows in Los Alamos, due to the intransigence of building code enforcement officials. Now the county wants to embark on a program to eradicate peeling interior paint? Does the county really want to generate more litigation, this time with another county department? Do we really want to spend county resources going to court to have a chair removed from someone’s porch or balcony?

A nuisance code serves many wonderful purposes: health, safety, and public welfare. These updated provisions are only indirectly related to genuine concerns about these issues. They are, on the contrary, pretentious and discouraging for those who want to settle in this city. You can build as many houses as you want in an effort to encourage people to live here rather than surrounding areas – but no one will want to live in this town if they continue to use ‘health and safety’ as a justification of elitism.

Elizabeth J Church.

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Newtown Native, president of the local homeowners association, remembered for his work in the community https://sahara-acaps.org/newtown-native-president-of-the-local-homeowners-association-remembered-for-his-work-in-the-community/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 17:37:17 +0000 https://sahara-acaps.org/newtown-native-president-of-the-local-homeowners-association-remembered-for-his-work-in-the-community/ By John Fey Posted: 5:10 a.m. EDT August 24, 2022Posted: August 24, 2022Updated: 2:31 PM EDT August 25, 2022 Image via Lisa Rayder’s family, originally appearing in the Bucks County Courier Times Rayder is remembered for his career in the pharmaceutical industry and his work in the Newtown community. A long-time pharmaceutical market researcher and […]]]>

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Image via Lisa Rayder’s family, originally appearing in the Bucks County Courier Times

Rayder is remembered for his career in the pharmaceutical industry and his work in the Newtown community.

A long-time pharmaceutical market researcher and active member of the community is known for her work in the Newtown area. Nick Vandal wrote about the Newtown native for the Bucks County Mail Schedules.

Lisa Rayder died at the age of 65 on August 19 at Chandler Hall Health Services Hospice. She went through a short battle with liver cancer.

Rayder first moved to the Philadelphia area from Connecticut in 1986 and earned her MBA from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1988. While earning her bachelor’s degree in Massachusetts, she met her future husband while that she worked in a laboratory. They married and lived in the Yarldey area for many years.

Outside of her career in the pharmaceutical industry, Rayder was very active in her community. She served as president of the Newtown Villas Homeowners Association, which she and her husband moved into in 2014.

“She was so smart. She had a Ph.D., Penn MBA, post-doc at Harvard,” said Steve Mosley, Rayder’s husband. “She was a very, very intelligent woman.”

Learn more about Rayder’s life, career and community work at Bucks County Mail Schedules.

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